Guerrilla Girls, Do Women Have To Be Naked To Get Into The Met Museum, 1989 courtesy of www.guerrillagirls.com

The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis presents a poster installation, part of the Guerrilla Girls Twin Cities Takeover, a festival organised by a collaboration of Twin Cities arts and cultural organisations in celebration of the Guerrilla Girls’ 30th anniversary as an activist art group.

Who are the “Guerrilla Girls”? A group of female artists in 1985 formed to expose sexism and racism in the art world, politics and to challenge society at large. The anonymous artists gained recognition through their posters, stickers, books, printed projects, and actions which shed light to not just gender inequality but also race bias in culture too.

A recent twitter feed from the guerrilla girls expressing their view on the recent Oscars :

ggirls

The group’s members wear gorilla masks during public appearances, less now to protect their identity and more so to not draw away attention from the message they are sending out and by adopting the names of deceased famous female figures such as Alma Thomas, Gertrude Stein, and Frida Kahlo.

Thirty years on, the “Guerrilla girls” are still activists on key issues which they strongly believed from the get-go. The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis now have 88 posters and more Guerrilla Girls Artwork on display for the public.

For a complete schedule of Guerrilla Girls Twin Cities Takeover events, visit ggtakeover.com.